Have Game, Will Play: Crimsonland

Crimsonland is a bloody twin-stick shooter that was originally released in 2003. Developer 10tons Ltd decided to give it an overhaul and enhance it. The latest version of Crimsonland still places your controllable character in a flat environment with multitudes of advancing enemies.

While Crimsonland is a twin-stick shooter it does require you to use the mouse or trigger button to fire. That makes taking down the hordes of aliens, lizards and spiders that much more difficult. Quest is the main mode and puts players through a series of waves. There is a meter conveniently located at the top of the screen that indicates the progress of the current wave.

Dead enemies often leave behind new permanent weapons, perks and temporary power-ups. Typically whichever new weapon you unlock at the end of a stage becomes the first weapon available in the next, not including the pistol you always begin with by default. Perks are earned with XP you gain from slaying enemies.Faster reloading, uranium filled bullets or faster movement are just a few of the many perks available.

Survival mode doesn’t change up the gameplay much but it does allow for some slight variations in the wave-based level structure. Crimsonland does allow up to four player local coop; and trust me help would be greatly appreciated. There are faster and flashier twin-stick shooters around but Crimsonland is solid and focused – – on killing things and turning everything red.

Recommendation: Worth a buy on sale
Full Disclosure: This Steam version of this game was provided to GameEnthus by the publisher.
Genre: bloody twin-stick shooter
Developer: 10tons Ltd
Publisher: 10tons Ltd
Platforms: Steam, soon on PS4
Price: $13.99

http://www.Crimsonland.com/
http://GameEnthus.com
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/gameenthus-podcast-video-games/id286435007?mt=2

Scale:
Worth a buy – paying full price for fans of the series or genre makes sense – often includes a caveat
Worth a buy on sale – not quite full price worthy but close, – often includes a caveat
No – borrow it if you must play it
Please no – Don’t waste any time and/or money on it